Month: April 2016

BREAKING: 16-Year-Old Girl Has Been Missing For 3 Weeks, Maywood Police Say

Missing Person.png

Latrice Chillis, 16, who went missing on April 4. | Maywood Police Department

Friday, April 29, 2016 || By Michael Romain 

Maywood Police are searching for a 16-year-old girl who has been missing for the last three weeks, according to detectives.

The last contact family members had with Latrice Chillis was on April 4, according to a missing persons report. Chillis is described as 5’8 inches, 230 pounds, with medium complexion, brown eyes and black hair that was braided the last time she was seen by relatives.

According to Maywood Detective Nick Belcore, Chillis is believed to be staying with friends she met on Facebook either in Maywood or on the West Side of Chicago.

Anyone with information regarding the teenager’s whereabouts is encouraged to contact the Maywood Police Department at (708) 450-4471. All calls should reference this case. The case number is 15-5337. VFP

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Unsurprisingly, District 89 Sixth Graders Lag Way Behind Rich Students, Study Shows

NYT graphic.png

A New York Times graphic, based on data compiled by researchers at Stanford, showing a correlation between socioeconomic status and academic performance among sixth graders throughout the country. | Screenshot

Friday, April 29, 2016 || By Michael Romain 

An April 29 New York Times article, seizing on recent research out of Stanford University, paints in vivid, data-rich detail what many people, by now, simply intuit.

On average, sixth graders at District 89 schools performed more than five grade levels lower on reading and math tests than sixth graders in Lexington, Massachusetts between 2009 and 2012.

More locally, D89 sixth graders performed nearly four grade levels lower than their counterparts in River Forest District 90 — where children performed nearly three grades ahead — and in Oak Park District 97 — where they performed nearly two grades ahead.

The reason for the discrepancies aren’t shrouded in mystery.

The median family income in District 89 during the years in question was $47,000, according to the Stanford study. The district’s student population is 55 percent Hispanic and 41 percent African-American. In Lexington, the median family income is $163,000 and the student body is 59 percent white and 33 percent Asian/other.

In Oak Park, the median family income was nearly $100,000 and the student population was around 56 percent white and 13 percent Asian/other. In River Forest, median family income was more than $180,000 and the student population was 76 percent white and 10 percent Asian/other.

Most other public school districts across the country, the data shows, are governed by the same stubborn dynamics of race and economics. There are two axes on the Times’s beautifully rendered graph. The horizontal axes reflects parents’ socioeconomic status while the vertical axes reflects grade-level performance on reading and math tests relative to other public school districts.

As is expected, there’s an undeniable correlation between the median family income and academic performance. As the Times notes:

“What emerges clearly in the data is the extent to which race and class are inextricably linked, and how that connection is exacerbated in school settings.

“Not only are black and Hispanic children more likely to grow up in poor families, but middle-class black and Hispanic children are also much more likely than poor white children to live in neighborhoods and attend schools with high concentrations of poor students.

“These schools can face a myriad of challenges. They tend to have more difficulty recruiting and keeping the most skilled teachers, and classes are more likely to be disrupted by violent incidents or the emotional fallout from violence in the neighborhood. These schools often offer fewer high-level classes such as Advanced Placement courses, and the parents have fewer resources to raise extra money that can provide enhanced arts programs and facilities.”

Perhaps somewhat less surprisingly, however, is this graph:

NYT graphic II.png

The Times:

“Even more sobering, the analysis shows that the largest gaps between white children and their minority classmates emerge in some of the wealthiest communities, such as Berkeley, Calif.; Chapel Hill, N.C.; and Evanston, Ill. The study, by Sean F. Reardon, Demetra Kalogrides andKenneth Shores of Stanford, also reveals large academic gaps in places like Atlanta and Menlo Park, Calif., which have high levels of segregation in the public schools.” VFP

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S O M E  U P C O M I N G  E V E N T S 

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Earth Day Clean Up.jpg

In honor of the late Lennel Grace, a tireless Maywood advocate for clean paths, sidewalks and streets, attend this year’s annual Illinois Prairie Path Cleanup, Saturday, April 30, 8:45 a.m. to 12 p.m., starting at 11th Avenue and Prairie Path, in Maywood. RSVP JoAnn Murphy, so she can plan accordingly.

Operation Uplift to host April 30 reunion kickoff/fundraiser, in lieu of annual luncheon

West TownOperation Uplift, the Maywood nonprofit that operates the West Town Museum of Cultural History and hosts an annual Martin Luther King, Jr., luncheon, has announced that it will be hosting a reunion kickoff to help support and bring awareness to its daily services in lieu of a luncheon this year.

“Please help us continue to provide more cultural awareness to our local community, stimulate individual growth,  community pride, and educate the Proviso Township area about the collections of art, artifacts and significant historical materials we hold within our doors,” according to a recent release put out by the organization.

The reunion kickoff activities will include educational tours, an African attire fashion show, live entertainment and food.

It will take place on Saturday, April 30, from 1 PM to 4 PM, at Operation Uplift/West Town Museum, 104 S. 5th Avenue, Maywood.

Donations or pledges of any amount are greatly appreciated. Those who give via checks should make them payable to: Operation Uplift, Inc.

For more information please call Jeri Stenson at 708-289-4955 or email operationupliftinc@gmail.com. VFP

WOW Fundraising Event, May 1

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Chronicle: Triton Demands Teacher Salary Give-Backs To Fill $7M Budget Hole

Triton-College-300x225.jpgFriday, April 29, 2016 || Originally Published: Cook County Chronicle || 4/22/16 || By Bill Dwyer

Faced with a statewide higher education funding crisis fomented by the ongoing political stalemate in Springfield, the Triton College Board of Trustees is pressuring its teacher’s unions to give back millions in salary.

Triton is faced with an $8.1 million state funding shortfall for fiscal year 2016, with $1.2 million of that in state Monetary Award Program, or MAP, funding for some 1,100 financially needy Triton students.

Triton covered the $1.2 million for the current school year from its reserves, but will not do so for the next school year.

There have been two meetings so far between the school’s administration and its faculty. The faculty unions will meet April 26 to discuss the negotiations, then will hear a presentation by board chairman Mark Stephens on April 28.

Depending on which side you speak with, the negotiations are either cordial and fruitful, or rife with distrust.

The person most deeply involved in the process — Stephens — is not speaking publicly. He was absent from the April 19 board meeting, and did not return a message left with his secretary seeking comment to the Cook County Chronicle.

Noting Stephens’ absence Tuesday evening, board vice chair Donna Peluso said she wasn’t going to “get into the complicated reasons” Stephens wasn’t present. She concluded cryptically that Stephens “loves his son.”

Unconfirmed reports are that Stephens was attending his son’s college baseball game. A check of the Beloit College calendar showed that there was, in fact, a junior varsity baseball game scheduled for April 19.

On Thursday vice president for business Sean Sullivan phoned to discuss the situation. He noted that the budget crunch is a statewide college issue, one that only elected officials in Springfield can resolve.

“Somebody’s gotta come to the table and make decisions in Springfield,” he said. “It was virtually without warning. They just stopped the funding.”

On Friday that happened in part, after the state General Assembly approved some $600 million in MAP funding. Crain’s Chicago business reported that Gov. Bruce Rauner has signaled his intention to sign that legislation.

That would return the $1.2 million to Triton’s coffers, easing, but not solving, the problem.

Sullivan, who noted that there is a projected $6.85 million gap in FY2017, said the board and administration have met with the seven unionized college bargaining units, and two non-union employee groups.

Sullivan said that while the negotiations are still in process, “I personally have been very encouraged by the meetings. We’ve had some fruitful discussions.”

He characterized all the parties involved as being “committed to working together.”

Sullivan did not mention that, despite the severe budget crunch, Triton has hired the former president of the faculty union to fill a newly created position this fall, at a reported $185,000 annually.

On Tuesday night one public speaker at the board meeting noted to the board that Triton employs 50 administrators and just hired a person to fill the newly created administrative position of “Dean of Education.” The speaker called that move “fiscally irresponsible.”

Triton faculty union president Stu Sikora did not return numerous messages seeking comment, and adjunct faculty union president Bill Justiz was out of town until Monday.

However the Chronicle spoke with one Triton faculty member who asked to remain anonymous for fear of retribution.

“I am definitely concerned about my job due to what is going on at Triton,” the teacher said.

“The chairman has asked the faculty to give up our pay raise.” While noting that the give-back is purportedly temporary, the teacher added, “Nobody trusts that.”

The source also noted that the unions have been warned that in the absence of salary concessions, eight non-tenured Triton teachers will be fired.

Union leaders, the source said, haven’t been encouraging.

“They’ve been clear that there’s only one choice, and that’s to do what (Mark Stephens) wants.”

The source also was skeptical of Triton’s willingness to apply the same fiscal pain to the administration that it was demanding of teachers, citing Triton’s long practice of having a high number of administrators relative to teachers.

“Their salaries are huge but they have assistants,” the source said of the school’s administration.

To read more, click here. VFP

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S O M E  U P C O M I N G  E V E N T S 

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Earth Day Clean Up.jpg

In honor of the late Lennel Grace, a tireless Maywood advocate for clean paths, sidewalks and streets, attend this year’s annual Illinois Prairie Path Cleanup, Saturday, April 30, 8:45 a.m. to 12 p.m., starting at 11th Avenue and Prairie Path, in Maywood. RSVP JoAnn Murphy, so she can plan accordingly.

Operation Uplift to host April 30 reunion kickoff/fundraiser, in lieu of annual luncheon

West TownOperation Uplift, the Maywood nonprofit that operates the West Town Museum of Cultural History and hosts an annual Martin Luther King, Jr., luncheon, has announced that it will be hosting a reunion kickoff to help support and bring awareness to its daily services in lieu of a luncheon this year.

“Please help us continue to provide more cultural awareness to our local community, stimulate individual growth,  community pride, and educate the Proviso Township area about the collections of art, artifacts and significant historical materials we hold within our doors,” according to a recent release put out by the organization.

The reunion kickoff activities will include educational tours, an African attire fashion show, live entertainment and food.

It will take place on Saturday, April 30, from 1 PM to 4 PM, at Operation Uplift/West Town Museum, 104 S. 5th Avenue, Maywood.

Donations or pledges of any amount are greatly appreciated. Those who give via checks should make them payable to: Operation Uplift, Inc.

For more information please call Jeri Stenson at 708-289-4955 or email operationupliftinc@gmail.com. VFP

‘We’ll Create 50 to 60 Full-Time Jobs,’ Says Trucking Co. CEO Eyeing Move To Maywood

Fore Trucking

A truck that’s part of a fleet owned by Fore Transporation, Inc., based in Harvey, IL, and which is looking to expand its operations by building a second location in Maywood. | Fore Transportation

James Apa.jpgThursday, April 28, 2016 || By Michael Romain 

A Harvey-Based trucking company is seeking to expand its operations by purchasing village-owned land at the corner of 9th and St. Charles, and constructing a 6,500 square-foot building to house its inventory of refrigerated trailers. James Apa, (pictured), the president and CEO of Fore Transportation, Inc., said his company would also use the Maywood location for truck repairs and the sale of parts.

Apa pitched his proposal to the Maywood Board of Trustees at an April 27 Legal, License and Ordinance Committee (LLOC) meeting. The board voted to move the measure to executive session, where they discussed a sales price for the vacant parcel, which Apa said he’d been interested in for more than two years.

According to data provided on its website, Fore, a family owned company, generated $30 million in sales in 2013. Apa said the company employs over 200 people. He noted that, if the deal goes through, the company hopes to add another 50 to 60 full-time positions at the Maywood location. Apa said the average starting wage for positions at his company is $20 an hour (“time-and-a-half after 40 [hours], full benefits”).

Apa, a native of Melrose Park who currently lives in Elmwood Park, said his company would be looking to hire licensed truck drivers, certified mechanics, salespeople, operations personnel and safety personnel for the Maywood location.

The Elmwood Park resident said that, when it comes to hiring preferences, his company would be looking for qualified applicants who live close to the facility, particularly when it comes to hiring truck drivers.

“We want people to be employed as close to our terminal as possible,” Apa said. He noted that, due to government regulations that restrict the number of hours drivers can be on the road, “The further the driver lives from the terminal, the less time they have to be on the street making me money. So, if I can have all my drivers live across the street from my terminal, it would make me a lot happier.”

The board met Apa’s April 27 presentation with general approval, although some trustees had concerns about how the location would affect the quality of life for residents who live in the area.

“Our Fifth Avenue corridor has got to be dealt with and more truck traffic is the least thing we need,” said Trustee Ron Rivers.

Apa, allaying Rivers’s concerns about his trucks possibly clogging already congested, truck-heavy 1st and 5th Avenues, said that his drivers would take “as many state routes as possible.” That would mean hewing to state-owned corridors like Lake Street and Mannheim Road, he said.

When Trustee Melvin Lightford expressed concerns about the night-time noise level related to a proposed facility that would operate 24 hours a day, Apa said that most night-time activity would be restricted to trucks driving in and out of the terminal.

“My trucks aren’t going to be blowing their horns, they’re going to be entering and exiting the property,” Apa said.

“The repairs, like putting the engine in and that kind of stuff, is going to be done during the day. The main heavy engine machinery work is done on first shift. You’re not going to have a driver with an 18-wheeler barreling down the street hitting his horn. If it happens, it’s only going to happen once. That I can tell you. My drivers aren’t going to do it again.”

Apa requested a Class 6b tax incentive, which allows new industrial developments in Cook County to qualify for a property tax reduction. According to the County County Assessor’s Office, properties receiving the incentive are only assessed at 10 percent of their market value for the first 10 years, 15 percent in the 11th year and 20 percent in the 12th year of their existence. Ordinarily, industrial real estate in the county is assessed at 25 percent of its market value.

Apa said he envisions a domino effect in the area if his company’s purchase of the land at 9th and St. Charles goes through — similar to the transformation that took place in Harvey after Fore moved into town in 2008.

“We bought the land. The road we were on was not conducive to truck traffic. We got together with the state and they put all new roads in,” he said.

“That whole industrial park that we’re located in has grown ten-fold since we’ve been there. When we moved there, we had less than 50 employees. We’ve brought 150 permanent jobs, 90 percent of them are from the area. And we’ve increased the value on our property and all properties around us significantly in an economic downturn.” VFP

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S O M E  U P C O M I N G  E V E N T S 

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Earth Day Clean Up.jpg

In honor of the late Lennel Grace, a tireless Maywood advocate for clean paths, sidewalks and streets, attend this year’s annual Illinois Prairie Path Cleanup, Saturday, April 30, 8:45 a.m. to 12 p.m., starting at 11th Avenue and Prairie Path, in Maywood. RSVP JoAnn Murphy, so she can plan accordingly.

Operation Uplift to host April 30 reunion kickoff/fundraiser, in lieu of annual luncheon

West TownOperation Uplift, the Maywood nonprofit that operates the West Town Museum of Cultural History and hosts an annual Martin Luther King, Jr., luncheon, has announced that it will be hosting a reunion kickoff to help support and bring awareness to its daily services in lieu of a luncheon this year.

“Please help us continue to provide more cultural awareness to our local community, stimulate individual growth,  community pride, and educate the Proviso Township area about the collections of art, artifacts and significant historical materials we hold within our doors,” according to a recent release put out by the organization.

The reunion kickoff activities will include educational tours, an African attire fashion show, live entertainment and food.

It will take place on Saturday, April 30, from 1 PM to 4 PM, at Operation Uplift/West Town Museum, 104 S. 5th Avenue, Maywood.

Donations or pledges of any amount are greatly appreciated. Those who give via checks should make them payable to: Operation Uplift, Inc.

For more information please call Jeri Stenson at 708-289-4955 or email operationupliftinc@gmail.com. VFP

WOW Fundraising Event, May 1

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Maywood To Get Speed Trailer; Board Could Give Allied Waste, Current Technology The Boot; Residents Want LNR store gone

speed-radar-trailer

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 || By Michael Romain 

Drivers traveling the streets of Maywood might be forced to pay closer attention to their speedometers. Last month, the Maywood Board of Trustees approved a request from the Maywood Police Department to purchase a speed display trailer at a cost of around $8,200.

Maywood Police Chief Valdimir Talley said that the department’s efforts to double-down on speeding drivers — the bane of many homeowners in the village, according to residents at various community meetings — have only gone so far.

Several months ago, the department outfitted its 2016 patrol unit vehicles with moving radar. It was a good first step, Talley said, but should be reinforced with the purchase of the display trailer.

“It’s necessary if we’re looking at re-gentrification on 17th and Madison,” Talley said at a March 9 Legal, License and Ordinance Committee (LLOC) meeting. “It would be a way to slow down traffic in that area around the school and as new business come into place.”

Talley said the trailer could also be placed in high-traffic areas like 1st Avenue, particularly during periods when construction is taking place.

The trailer won’t just be for show, either, Talley noted. Drivers who notice that they’re traveling well above the speed limit shouldn’t be surprised if they’re subsequently hit with a ticket.

Trustee Michael Rogers said he’s fielded numerous complaints from residents at various community meetings about speeding drivers and that the trailer is necessary.

“Our village does need within its inventory some kind of mechanism like this that is mobile, that we can put out in problem areas or in areas with construction,” he said, before adding that he was nonetheless leery about using the trailer as a means of issuing tickets.

“In my mind, the main reason to have this is the mental signal that it sends to people that they need to slow down here,” Rogers said. “And if you didn’t realize you were going too fast, this is telling you that you are. It gets a little complicated when you talk about [people getting tickets]. I would not be in favor of any red-light camera or speed camera ticketing.”

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Maywood Board of Trustees Could Give Allied Waste, Current Technology the Boot

AlliedSeveral members of the Maywood Board of Trustees have had it with Allied Waste — the firm with which the village contracts for its garbage hauling services — and Current Technology — the firm responsible for installing and maintaining the village’s outdated and chronically in-firmed system of 69 sky-way cameras.

Animated by mounting complaints from residents about what they claim are the firm’s shoddy waste hauling services, last month, a majority of trustees agreed to direct village staff to entertain bids from firms that are competitive with that of Republic Services, formerly Allied Waste.

Republic’s contract expires January 31, 2017, but the waste hauler isn’t going down without trying to make nice. Last month, it offered to “defer” a rate hike that was supposed to take effect in February for 12 months “in exchange for extending the contract for 12 months through January 2018,” according to a memo.

The company also said it would provide a maximum of $2,500 in credits for an electronic recycling program as part of a total package of savings to the village the firm put at $64,000, before touting its consistent support of “civic initiatives, including Maywood Senior Club.” If that wasn’t enough, the firm also noted its membership in the Maywood Chamber of Commerce (a $400/year value) and that it employs five residents.

But that fig leaf, of sorts, seems to have been to no avail, so far. The village is still shopping around.

Republic’s overtures are downright heavenly compared to the bad blood between the village and Current Technology, which, according to village officials, has no interest in continuing in its contract. The antipathy is the same, with several trustees voicing their disgust with what they’ve considered the company’s unresponsiveness and substandard service. Consider this working relationship over.

What will come of the village’s camera system once Current cuts out completely is, so far, anyone’s guess. When the issue came up of dealing with the ramifications of the village cutting off a relationship with its camera service provider, one trustee noted that the devices don’t work, anyway.

Fed up with LNR, some Maywood residents want the store gone, but mayor allows it to stay

LNRAt a board meeting last month, resident and meeting mainstay Gloria Clay channeled the rage of senior citizens who live in a senior living facility across the street from LNR Family Store, 1043 S. 5th Ave., who she said have been complaining about the constant loitering outside the store, particularly at night.

“I’ve talked to a couple of the seniors over there in that building,” Clay said. “One gentleman […] told me that the seniors are scared to go out at night, especially to the currency exchange.”

LNR, a well-known hot spot for all manner of vice, was one of three business in the village whose licenses were set to be revoked due to them having incurred multiple liquor, business and tobacco license violations.

The other two businesses, Captain Fresh Farm (1001 S. 9th Ave.) and Rosa’s Dollar Store (1401 S. 5th Ave.), have since closed down, according to Maywood Village Manager Willie Norfleet, Jr.

LNR, however, was granted mercy by Mayor Edwenna Perkins, who said she was asked by residents if the store could stay open. The mayor has the final say-so on the revocation of business licenses.

“People called me and asked me to keep the store open,” said Perkins, who in the past had expressed leeriness about closing three tax-paying businesses at the same time.

Norfleet said the mayor opted, instead, to have LNR closed for 15 days. VFP

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Earth Day Clean Up.jpg

In honor of the late Lennel Grace, a tireless Maywood advocate for clean paths, sidewalks and streets, attend this year’s annual Illinois Prairie Path Cleanup, Saturday, April 30, 8:45 a.m. to 12 p.m., starting at 11th Avenue and Prairie Path, in Maywood. RSVP JoAnn Murphy, so she can plan accordingly.

Operation Uplift to host April 30 reunion kickoff/fundraiser, in lieu of annual luncheon

West TownOperation Uplift, the Maywood nonprofit that operates the West Town Museum of Cultural History and hosts an annual Martin Luther King, Jr., luncheon, has announced that it will be hosting a reunion kickoff to help support and bring awareness to its daily services in lieu of a luncheon this year.

“Please help us continue to provide more cultural awareness to our local community, stimulate individual growth,  community pride, and educate the Proviso Township area about the collections of art, artifacts and significant historical materials we hold within our doors,” according to a recent release put out by the organization.

The reunion kickoff activities will include educational tours, an African attire fashion show, live entertainment and food.

It will take place on Saturday, April 30, from 1 PM to 4 PM, at Operation Uplift/West Town Museum, 104 S. 5th Avenue, Maywood.

Donations or pledges of any amount are greatly appreciated. Those who give via checks should make them payable to: Operation Uplift, Inc.

For more information please call Jeri Stenson at 708-289-4955 or email operationupliftinc@gmail.com. VFP

Loyola Opens $137M Research Center in Maywood; Village Teams With Nonprofit To Put People To Work

Loyola Center for Translational Research and Education

Loyola’s new, $137 million Center for Translational Research and Education, located on Loyola’s medical complex, which straddles First Avenue and Roosevelt Road in Maywood. The center opened on April 21. | Photo courtesy Loyola University Chicago

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 || By Michael Romain 

Last Thursday, Loyola University Chicago opened the Center for Translational Research and Education (CTRE) — a five-story, $137 million facility located on the institution’s health sciences campus in Maywood.

The 225,000 square-foot facility is the largest one the university’s ever built, according to an April 21 statement Loyola released on the day of the opening. The building will be home to 500 students, staff and faculty members.

“In medicine, research is a team effort and collaboration leads to innovative discoveries,” said John P. Pelissero, Loyola’s interim president, in the April 21 release.

Pelissero said the new building will unify the Maywood complex’s Stritch School of Medicine, the Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing and Loyola University Health System with the goal of rapidly translating fundamental scientific discoveries into “real treatments for human health.” That goal, university officials noted, aligns with the university’s 5-year plan, which is called Plan 2020: Building a More Just, Humane, and Sustainable World.

The new facility is expected to become gold LEED-certified and includes “two two-story atriums to promote outside-the-lab collaboration, a 90-seat seminar room, and a 265-seat auditorium for lectures and health-related community events.”

Larry M. Goldberg, the president and CEO of Loyola University Health System, said the Maywood complex is “one of few academic medical centers in the country in which a hospital, medical school, nursing school and major research center are connected on one campus,” according to the statement.

Maywood and the Chicago Lighthouse team up to put people to work, April 29

Maywood residents who have a desire to connect with potential employers can show up at the Village Council Chambers, 125 S. 5th Ave., in Maywood, on Friday, April 29, from 12 p.m. until 3 p.m., for critical information on doing so. See more below:

Put Maywood to Work

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A N N U A L  E A R T H  D A Y  C L E A N  U P, A P R I L  3 0

Earth Day Clean Up.jpg

In honor of the late Lennel Grace, a tireless Maywood advocate for clean paths, sidewalks and streets, attend this year’s annual Illinois Prairie Path Cleanup, Saturday, April 30, 8:45 a.m. to 12 p.m., starting at 11th Avenue and Prairie Path, in Maywood. RSVP JoAnn Murphy, so she can plan accordingly.

Operation Uplift to host April 30 reunion kickoff/fundraiser, in lieu of annual luncheon

West TownOperation Uplift, the Maywood nonprofit that operates the West Town Museum of Cultural History and hosts an annual Martin Luther King, Jr., luncheon, has announced that it will be hosting a reunion kickoff to help support and bring awareness to its daily services in lieu of a luncheon this year.

“Please help us continue to provide more cultural awareness to our local community, stimulate individual growth,  community pride, and educate the Proviso Township area about the collections of art, artifacts and significant historical materials we hold within our doors,” according to a recent release put out by the organization.

The reunion kickoff activities will include educational tours, an African attire fashion show, live entertainment and food.

It will take place on Saturday, April 30, from 1 PM to 4 PM, at Operation Uplift/West Town Museum, 104 S. 5th Avenue, Maywood.

Donations or pledges of any amount are greatly appreciated. Those who give via checks should make them payable to: Operation Uplift, Inc.

For more information please call Jeri Stenson at 708-289-4955 or email operationupliftinc@gmail.com. VFP

LLOC Meeting Tonight, April 27, 7 p.m. (Agenda Packet Inside)

Maywood Flag

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 || By COMMUNITY EDITOR

A Legal, License and Ordinance Committee (LLOC) meeting for the Maywood Board of Trustees is scheduled to take place tonight, Wednesday, April 27, 7 p.m., at 125 S. 5th Avenue. Among items to be discussed (click here to access the full agenda packet): VFP

The Chicago Lighthouse requested to Use the Village Council Chambers for Job Placement on April 29, 2016 from 12 noon till 6 P.M.
The Chicago Lighthouse – Job Placements
B. Village Manager’s Reports
1) Presentation by Mr. Apa, President and CEO of Fore Transportation to develop Village Property located at 9th and St. Charles
2) Discussion and consideration regarding Emergency Utility Repairs Bid Recommendation.  John West, Director of  Public Works recommends that a contract be drafted and entered into with Unique Plumbing to perform emergency water and sewer repairs as needed within the Village of Maywood.
Emergency Utility Repairs Bid Recommendation.pdf
3) Discussion and consideration regarding Tree Bid Recommendation for the Village of Maywood.  The bids were based on the cost to remove a tree, stump, and restoration based on various diameters of a tree.  Staff is seeking approval to accept the bid from Winkler’s Tree and Landscaping.
Tree Bid Recommendation.pdf
4) Discussion and consideration for Chief Valdimir Talley to make a presentation of the accomplishments for the Maywood Police Department through the First Quarter of 2016 to the Village Board:
• Earley Swear-in
• Introduction of new interns
MPD Request – Proposal No. 9 Re 2016 First Qtr. Accomplishments.pdf
5) Discussion and consideration regarding an update on legal counsel search by the Maywood Housing Authority and termination of Intergovernmental Agreement between the Village of Maywood, The Maywood Housing Authority and Klein, Thorpe and Jenkins, Ltd. with consent to Dual Representation Letter.
Intergovernmental Agreement Between the VOM and Maywood Housing Authority.pdf
6) Discussion and consideration regarding the renewal of the Mercury System Maintenance Agreement for the Emergency 911 Dispatch Equipment in the Police Department.
Renewal of Mercury System Maintenance Agreement for Emergency 911 Dispatch Equipment.pdf
7) Discussion and consideration regarding Premium Finance  Agreement with IPSF Corporation to pay for the Property and Casualty Package Renewal from Mesirow Financial and CS Insurance Strategies for the Village of Maywood.  This agreement and down payment is to be executed no later than May 20, 2016.
Premium Finance Agreement with IPSF Corporation.pdf