Tag: Mayor Perkins

Maywood Mayor Says ComEd Imposters Tried Scamming Her — ‘Don’t Let it Happen to You’

Thursday, September 21, 2017 || By Michael Romain || @maywoodnews 

“It happened to me, don’t let it happen to you,” said Maywood Mayor Edwenna Perkins during a Sept. 5 regular board meeting.

Perkins said that she’d recently received a call “from an organization saying they could cut my ComEd bill by 50 percent.”

Continue reading “Maywood Mayor Says ComEd Imposters Tried Scamming Her — ‘Don’t Let it Happen to You’”

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Maywood Approves >$100K in Backpay for Wrongfully Terminated Worker

Wednesday, September 20, 2017 || By Michael Romain || @maywoodnews  

During a Sept. 19 regular meeting, the Maywood Board of Trustees approved a payment of $106,128.13 in backpay to a village employee who alleged that he was wrongfully terminated in 2014. He has since been reinstated.

The board voted 5 to 1 in favor of the settlement, with Maywood Mayor Edwenna Perkins the lone dissenting vote. Maywood Trustee Melvin Lightford was absent.

Continue reading “Maywood Approves >$100K in Backpay for Wrongfully Terminated Worker”

Funeral Home Owner Offers to ‘Donate’ Vacant Property to Village, Which Declines

Friday, September 8, 2017 || By Michael Romain || @maywoodnews  

Featured image: Corbin Colonial Funeral Chapel in Maywood, which has been closed for roughly a decade.

During a Sept. 5 regular board meeting, Maywood Mayor Edwenna Perkins said that she recently got a call from the owner of the abandoned Corbin Colonial Funeral Chapel, located at 1001 Madison St. in Maywood. He had an offer.

Continue reading “Funeral Home Owner Offers to ‘Donate’ Vacant Property to Village, Which Declines”

Photos of the Week: On Eve of 9/11, Maywood Remembers Bataan

Monday, September 11, 2017 || By Michael Romain | Photos by Spooner Baumann || @maywoodnews 

On Sept. 10, a few hundred people gathered under a tent pitched at Maywood Veterans Memorial Park, located on the corner of 1st Ave. and Oak St., for the 75th Bataan Day commemorative service.

According to the Maywood Bataan Day Organization (MBDO), the service is the “longest running World War II commemorative event in the Chicago area.” This year, MBDO officials added, also marked the 100th anniversary of the United States’ entry into World War I.

Continue reading “Photos of the Week: On Eve of 9/11, Maywood Remembers Bataan”

Maywood Officials Say Mayor, Trustee Improperly Applied for $10K Grant

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 || By Michael Romain || @maywoodnews

Last month, the Maywood Board of Trustees voted unanimously to accept a $10,000 restorative justice capacity building grant from Cook County, but the board’s approval of the funds didn’t come without a lengthy, sometimes tense, debate about whether or not the money was secured appropriately.

Continue reading “Maywood Officials Say Mayor, Trustee Improperly Applied for $10K Grant”

Maywood to Host Property Tax Appeals Workshop Monday, Aug. 7, 6 PM

Sunday, August 6, 2017 || By Community Editor  || @maywoodnews || Feature image: Getty Images

Cook County Commissioner Richard R. Boykin (1st), Cook County Assessor Joe Berrios, Maywood Mayor Edwenna Perkins, the Maywood Board of Trustees and Rev. Marvin E. Wiley (pastor of the Rock of Ages Baptist Church in Maywood) will co-host a property tax appeal workshop on Monday, Aug. 7, from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m., at the TH Wade Building, 1405 Madison St. in Maywood.

Continue reading “Maywood to Host Property Tax Appeals Workshop Monday, Aug. 7, 6 PM”

Maywood Business Expands Thanks to County Brownfield Grant

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Seaway Supply Company owner Tom Engoren inside of his Maywood-based company on July 13. Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle, along with numerous other elected officials, were at Seaway to announce the results of a brownfield grant. | Michael Romain/VFP

IMG_6050Thursday, July 13, 2017 || By Michael Romain || @maywoodnews

Tom Engoren, the owner of Seaway Supply Co., located at 15 N. 9th Ave. in Maywood, said that a $600,000 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has allowed his business to stay, and possibly expand, in Maywood.

Seaway Supply, which deliveries janitorial products, office supplies and other materials throughout the Chicago area, is looking to acquire a gravel parcel adjacent its Maywood location that’s currently owned by the village.

The company wants to turn the parcel into a fenced-in parking lot and eventually use the land to possibly develop even more warehouse or office space in the future. Seaway has been located in Maywood for around six years, Engoren said.

But the village-owned land is located on a brownfield, which is “property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the
presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant,” according to the U.S. EPA.

The contamination is often petroleum-related. Examples of brownfield sites include “old gas stations, auto service businesses, factories, mill sites, shipyards, transit stations, and junkyards,” the EPA notes.

Typically, a business looking to build, expand or redevelop an area that’s suspected to be contaminated has to pay to conduct soil tests and, if those tests find that the area has been polluted or contaminated, then the business also has to pay for the necessary cleanup.

An official with Weaver Consultants Group, the firm that Cook County contracted with to provide environmental testing and remediation services, said that it can cost between $3,000 and $5,000 to conduct phase one soil testing. Phase two cleanup efforts start at around $15,000 to $20,000.

The EPA grant — which was administered by the Cook County Department of Environmental Control in collaboration with the villages of Maywood, Bellwood, Melrose Park, Forest Park, Schiller Park, Northlake and Franklin Park — basically pays for those phase one and phase two costs. The county received the grant money in 2014.

“These tests, while they’re not terribly expensive, they’re not cheap,” said Engoren. “Even before you buy the [land], you have to invest money to just look at it and consider it. This program takes the guesswork out of the process for potential buyers.”

Engoren added that completing the environmental remediation process also clears a big hurdle for businesses trying to access the necessary credit to fund expansion and redevelopment efforts. As of press time, it wasn’t known how the land that Seaway is trying to acquire got contaminated. Seaway is located in an area zoned for industrial and manufacturing uses.

According to estimates by the Center for Neighborhood Technology, there are nearly 90 brownfield parcels located in western Cook County. And the Illinois State Fire Marshall has counted 684 petroleum-related Underground Storage Tank (UST) locations in the seven municipalities participating in the grant program.

The CNT estimates that there are 17 brownfield parcels in Maywood alone that cover nearly 50 acres, six brownfield parcels in Bellwood covering 17 acres and nine brownfield parcels in Melrose Park covering nearly 50 acres.

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Maywood brownfield sites targeted by EPA grant 

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Bellwod and Melrose Park brownfield sites targeted by EPA grant 

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“This program is truly an economic development driver,” said Maywood Mayor Edwenna Perkins during a July 13 press conference convened at Seaway Supply to mark the completion of the grant program.

“This program allowed Maywood to receive funding for environmental assessments that will lead to redevelopment of several vacant lots that had not hope for redevelopment.”

In all, the grant program identified and assessed 30 sites in the seven aforementioned coalition communities that cover 127 acres. Currently, more than 120 acres are in the process of redevelopment or are being planned for future reuse, according to a statement released by Cook County Board President on June 13.

“Brownfield sites are difficult to redevelop,” Preckwinkle said at the June 13 press conference. “By freeing up these sites for reinvestment, we not only protect the environment but we reduce eyesores for these communities.”

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Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle, Maywood Mayor Edwenna Perkins and other elected officials inside of Seaway Supply Co. on June 13. | Michael Romain/VFP

In addition to Seaway Supply Company, other sites that were tested and/or cleaned up include the former Maywood Racetrack in Melrose Park, six parcels that sit on over five acres in Bellwood and several more parcels in Maywood that cover nearly four acres.

“I can think of no better place for this to happen than in the village of Maywood,” said Cook County Commissioner Richard Boykin (1st), whose district includes Maywood and Bellwood.

“Maywood has had significant challenges relating to unemployment and businesses leaving … This is a shot in the arm for businesses that want to expand, want jobs and want to work here. It’s good for our tax base, it’s good for everybody.” VFP

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